Swansea

Swansea (pronounced: Swan-zee; Welsh: Abertawe) is a city on the South Wales coast. With a population approaching 250,000, it is the second largest city in Wales, and on the beautiful Gower Peninsula – the United Kingdom’s first designated “Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty”.

For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation).
This article is about the urban area of Swansea. The Swansea Rural is covered in a separate article.

. . . Swansea . . .

  • Swansea Urban (this article) – from north to south covering areas from Morriston and Clydach to St.Thomas and Swansea Bay sea front and from east to west covering areas from Port Tennant to Caswell. Swansea Urban includes the city centre and the tourist areas of the Maritime Quarter, Mumbles, Limeslade, Langland and Caswell.
  • Gower Peninsula – covering all points west of Bishopston, Pwll Du Bay, Fairwood Common and Upper Killay, and also including the highland areas of Pontarddulais and Mawr.

During medieval times, Swansea was a prosperous market town, later gaining a certain prominence as a spa resort. It was during the industrial revolution, however, that the city flourished and its population grew. The city is home to the world’s first passenger railway service known as the Mumbles Train, which bumped and bounced along five miles of Swansea foreshore, linking the city centre with the suburb of Mumbles. Much of the city centre’s architectural heritage was lost through wartime bombing. However, the abundance of parks, stunning coastal scenery, lovely water-side suburbs, a magnificent bay-side maritime quarter, varied cultural events, medieval castles and golden sandy beaches have preserved Swansea’s place as a major tourist destination. Furthermore, according to a survey conducted by an international health magazine that considered, among other factors, a city’s crime rate, life-style, environment, etc., Swansea was judged to be the most relaxed city in the UK, while two national surveys have ranked the city as the third friendliest place in the country with regard to customer service and the safest urban area in the UK. Citizens from Wales’ second city are known as ‘Swansea Jacks,’ and the name ‘Swansea’ is derived from ‘Sweyn’s-ey,’ the Scandinavian name for the original settlement.

Dylan Thomas was passionate about Swansea, and in his early days described it as an “ugly, lovely town, crawling, sprawling, slummed, unplanned, jerry-villa’d, and smug-suburbed by the side of a long and splendid curving shore.” Later, he referred to it as “the most romantic town I know,” and described it with great gusto as a “marble town, city of laughter, little Dublin” and screamed triumphantly “Never was there such a town!”

Incidentally, the Swansea seaside resort of Mumbles derives its name from the French word mamelles, meaning “breasts”; take a look at the two islets off Mumbles Head from across the bay, and it is easy to see why.

Swansea
Climate chart (explanation)
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
 
96
 
 
8
4
 
 
 
67
 
 
8
4
 
 
 
73
 
 
10
5
 
 
 
59
 
 
12
6
 
 
 
63
 
 
15
9
 
 
 
64
 
 
18
12
 
 
 
72
 
 
20
14
 
 
 
84
 
 
20
14
 
 
 
77
 
 
18
12
 
 
 
123
 
 
14
10
 
 
 
112
 
 
11
7
 
 
 
110
 
 
9
5
Average max. and min. temperatures in °C
Precipitation+Snow totals in mm
Source: Wikipedia. Visit the Met Office for a five-day forecast.
Imperial conversion
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
 
3.8
 
 
46
39
 
 
 
2.6
 
 
46
38
 
 
 
2.9
 
 
49
41
 
 
 
2.3
 
 
53
43
 
 
 
2.5
 
 
59
49
 
 
 
2.5
 
 
64
53
 
 
 
2.8
 
 
67
57
 
 
 
3.3
 
 
67
57
 
 
 
3
 
 
64
54
 
 
 
4.8
 
 
58
50
 
 
 
4.4
 
 
52
44
 
 
 
4.3
 
 
48
40
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation+Snow totals in inches

Swansea has a wet and mild climate, with winter temperatures ranging from around 4 to 6°C, while the summer average high is about 20°C but often reaching to 26 or 27°C. Sun lovers should visit Swansea from June to August, which is the period that records the most hours of sunshine and is the main tourist season. However, those who prefer long solitary walks along cliffs paths or contemplative strolls through wooded valleys should consider September and October. During these months, the air is crisp and fresh and the area quiet, with most tourists having already departed. However, as Wales is one of the wettest areas in the UK, you should always prepare for rain when visiting the region. Even in the summer, pack some rain gear and an umbrella in your luggage.

Famous Faces

Swansea’s rich and diverse history has created a city of character, which has proved to be very fertile ground for producing well known personalities. In the literary world, Martin Amis and Dylan Thomas were born in the city and inscriptions of Thomas’ verses can been found throughout the city. The Oscar award-winning actor Catherine Zeta Jones was born and raised here, as were actors Joanna Page and Matt Ryan. The 1970s and 80s rock sensation Bonnie Tyler is also from Swansea and still lives in the seaside suburb of Mumbles. Sir Harry Secombe, who entertained the country for decades, hails from Swansea’s East Side, and also in the entertainment world, the TV playwright and producer Russell T. Davies (of Doctor Who fame) has his roots in the city, as does composer Sir Karl Jenkins and Ian Hislop (captain of BBC quiz show Have I Got News for You and editor of Private Eye). In the upper echelons of religion, economics, politics, and royalty, the former Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr. Rowan Williams, Nobel Prize Winner Professor Clive Granger, former deputy-prime minister, Sir Michael Heseltine, former leader of the Conservative Party, Michael Howard and Princess Lilian of Sweden, were all born in Swansea, while among the city’s most famous contributions to the sporting world were the soccer legend, John Charles, England cricketer Simon Jones and former WBO world cruiser weight champion, Enzo Maccarinelli.

Within a few miles of Swansea is the birthplace of Hollywood legends Richard Burton, Anthony Hopkins and Ray Milland, and opera stars Katherine Jenkins and Paul Potts.

The city’s most loved character, however, is undoubtedly Jack the black retriever. During his seven years of life, he rescued no less than twenty-seven people from drowning in the murky waters of Swansea docks, and there is a small memorial in honor of this little hero on the foreshore, near the St. Helen’s Stadium.

. . . Swansea . . .

This article is issued from web site Wikivoyage. The original article may be a bit shortened or modified. Some links may have been modified. The text is licensed under “Creative Commons – Attribution – Sharealike” [1] and some of the text can also be licensed under the terms of the “GNU Free Documentation License” [2]. Additional terms may apply for the media files. By using this site, you agree to our Legal pages . Web links: [1] [2]

. . . Swansea . . .

© 2022 The Grey Earl INFO - WordPress Theme by WPEnjoy