Mohamed Seghir Boushaki

Mohamed Seghir Boushaki (Arabic: [محمد الصغير بوسحاقي]), (born 27 November 1869 in Thénia, Boumerdès Province, Kabylie, Algeria; died 1959 in Thenia, Algeria) was an Algerian Berber politician after the French conquest of Algeria.[1]

For other uses, see Boushaki.

Mohamed Seghir Boushaki
Arabic: [محمد الصغير بوسحاقي]
City council of French Algeria in Thenia
In office
1935–1939
Governor Georges Le Beau (1935–1940)
City council of French Algeria in Thenia
In office
1925–1930
Governor Maurice Viollette (1925–1927)
Pierre Bordes (1927–1930)
City council of French Algeria in Thenia
In office
1920–1925
Governor Jean-Baptiste Abel (1919–1921)
Théodore Steeg (1921–1925)
Henri Dubief (1925–1925)
Personal details
Born 1869
Thenia, Algiers department, Kabylie, Algeria.
Died 1959
Thenia, Algiers department, Kabylie, Algeria.
Spouse(s) Fatma Cherifi
Khdaouedj Tafat Bouzid
Yamna Afiri.

. . . Mohamed Seghir Boushaki . . .

Mohamed Seghir Boushaki was born in 1869 in the village of Thala Oufella (Kabyle: ⵟⵀⴰⵍⴰ Oⵓⴼⴻⵍⵍⴰ) called Soumâa (called Arabic: الصومعة) because of the ruins of Benian ntâa Soumâa.[2]

This ancient Berber citadel of Benian ntâa Soumâa was built by King Nubel [fr] when the region of Thenia was the capital of Kabylie and Mitidja in North Africa during Antiquity.[3]

The lands ranging from Oued Boumerdès and Oued Meraldene in the west to Oued Isser to the east of the village “Thala Oufella (Soumâa)” belonged to the tribe of “Aïth Aïcha” to which Mohamed belonged Seghir Boushaki before the French conquest of Algeria.[4]

Just two years after the birth of Mohamecd Seghir, all of Kabylie rallied to the “Mokrani Revolt” on 16 March 1871 to expel the French colonial troops from the plain and the heights.[5]

After the defeat of the brotherhood of the Rahmaniya in this Kabyle uprising, the tribal leaders were deported to New Caledonia, among them Cheikh Boumerdassi and “Ahmed Ben Belkacem” the chief of the “Aïth Aïcha” who was close to Mohamed Seghir.[6]

“Ahmed Ben Belkacem”, born in 1837 and son of Ahmed, was deported under the “Number 18744”.[7]

. . . Mohamed Seghir Boushaki . . .

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. . . Mohamed Seghir Boushaki . . .

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