The Great Sinner

The Great Sinner is a 1949 American drama film directed by Robert Siodmak. Based on the 1866 short novel The Gambler written by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, the film stars Gregory Peck, Ava Gardner, Frank Morgan, Ethel Barrymore, Walter Huston, Agnes Moorehead and Melvyn Douglas.

1949 film by Robert Siodmak

The Great Sinner

Theatrical poster
Directed by Robert Siodmak
Screenplay by Christopher Isherwood
Ladislaus Fodor
René Fülöp-Miller
Based on The Gambler
1866 novel
by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Produced by Gottfried Reinhardt
Starring Gregory Peck
Ava Gardner
Melvyn Douglas
Cinematography George J. Folsey
Edited by Harold F. Kress
Music by Bronisław Kaper
Production
company
Distributed by Loew’s Inc.
Release date
  • June 29, 1949 (1949-06-29)
Running time
110 minutes
Country United States
Budget $2,075,000[1]
Box office $2,041,000[1]

. . . The Great Sinner . . .

The film opens in the 1860s in a run-down attic room in Wiesbaden, with a man (whose name we soon learn is Fedya) lying on a bed in the foreground. A violent storm knocks open the windows, sending the pages of a manuscript flying around the room. A woman (later revealed to be Pauline Ostrovsky, a reformed gambling addict), enters and shuts the windows, looking tenderly at Fedya. Picking up the pages of the manuscript, she realizes that they are a memoir that Fedya has been writing. The main narrative follows as an extended flashback, sometimes with voiceover narration by Fedya.

While traveling by train from Moscow to Paris, Fedya, a writer, meets Pauline, who passes the time playing solitaire. Attracted to her, he decides to disembark with her at Wiesbaden and follows her to a casino. There, he finds that Pauline is a gambling addict like her father General Ostrovsky who is also at the casino. Upon seeing how undisturbed the Ostrovskys are to find out the General’s wealthy mother is dying, he becomes interested in the effects of gambling. He decides to stay in Wiesbaden to do a character study of gambling addicts.

One of them is Aristide Pitard, an old thief and gambler who steals Fedya’s money. Taking pity on the man, Fedya offers Aristide money to leave the city. Instead, Aristide uses the money to gamble and he eventually shoots himself in desperation. Before dying, he gives Fedya a pawn ticket and asks him to redeem it and return the pawned article to its owner. However, he dies before divulging the name of this person. When Fedya goes to the pawnshop he discovers that the pledged item is a religious medal, and later finds out that it belongs to Pauline. Meanwhile, he has fallen deeply in love with her, despite her father’s discouragement of a romantic involvement with her.

After returning the medal, Fedya finds out Pauline is pledged to an arranged marriage with Armand de Glasse, the wealthy but ruthless manager of the casino. Aware that Pauline is not engaged to Armand out of love, but as a payment for her father’s big debts to the casino, Fedya decides to start gambling himself to earn enough money to pay off the General’s debts. He initially earns a lot of money at roulette and becomes a gambling addict himself. However, after a period of fame for his winning streak, his luck runs out and he loses all of his money at the casino.

Fedya eventually is forced to borrow money from Armand to continue his gambling. After this, he even goes as far as pawning his possessions. When he is completely broke, Fedya has a vision in which Aristide hands him a gun to shoot himself. Delirious, he grabs Pauline’s medal and attempts to sell it to pawnbroker Emma Getzel. She refuses to buy it however, after which he almost kills her before losing consciousness. In the end, Fedya completes his manuscript. After, he turns to Pauline, who forgives him for his behavior.

. . . The Great Sinner . . .

This article is issued from web site Wikipedia. The original article may be a bit shortened or modified. Some links may have been modified. The text is licensed under “Creative Commons – Attribution – Sharealike” [1] and some of the text can also be licensed under the terms of the “GNU Free Documentation License” [2]. Additional terms may apply for the media files. By using this site, you agree to our Legal pages . Web links: [1] [2]

. . . The Great Sinner . . .

© 2022 The Grey Earl INFO - WordPress Theme by WPEnjoy